Canada

Apply for express entry federal skilled worker in Canada

In this post, we will be discussing about How to apply for express entry federal skilled worker in Canada and how to immigrate to canada skilled worker. FSWP is the main way for skilled immigrants to move to Canada. As back as 1967, Canada became the first country in the world to introduce an objective points system to welcome skilled immigrants. Canada mainly focus on objective factors such as age, education, language skills, and work experience to qualify an immigrant to succeed in the country’s labour market.

You must meet the minimum eligibility for express entry federal skilled worker In order to be eligible to submit an Express Entry profile under the Federal Skilled Worker Program. Once you’re in the Express Entry pool, canada use a different system to rank your profile. They select the highest-ranking candidates from the pool and invite them to apply for permanent residence.

Education:

If your education was completed in Canada, you must have a certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian secondary institution (high school) or post-secondary institution.

If your education was not completed in Canada, you must have:

Language Proficiency: 

  • You must take an approved language test showing you are proficient in either English or French for ,writing, reading, listening and speaking.   Further more, you must get a minimum score of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 in all 4 abilities although the higher you score, the better your chances of success. After the Canadian Language Benchmark test,  you go ahead to enter the test results in your Express Entry profile

Note : Your language tests are valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

Settlement Funds: 

  • You must show that you have enough money for you and your family to settle in Canada, unless you:
    • are currently able to legally work in Canada
    • have a valid job offer from an employer in Canada
    • This table shows the minimum amount you need to immigrate to Canada. If you have more money, you should list the full amount in your profile or application.

       

      Number of
      family members
      Funds required
      (in Canadian dollars)
      1 $13,213
      2 $16,449
      3 $20,222
      4 $24,553
      5 $27,847
      6 $31,407
      7 $34,967
      For each additional family member $3,560

    You must have enough funds to support your settlement in Canada. Details are below.

Work Experience: You must have a minimum of 12-months of full-time, skilled work experience, or an equivalent amount in part-time experience. This experience must be continuous and in a single occupation. To be considered “skilled” experience, you must have been working in an occupation at National Occupation Classification (NOC) Skill Level 0, A, or B.

Your skilled work experience must be

  • in the same type of job (have the same NOC) as the job you want to use for your immigration application (called your primary occupation)
  • within the last 10 years
  • paid work (have been paid wages or earned commission—volunteer work or unpaid internships don’t count)
  • at least 1 year of continuous work or 1,560 hours total (30 hours per week)—you can meet this in a few different ways:
    • full-time at 1 job: 30 hours/week for 12 months = 1 year full-time (1,560 hours)
    • equal amount in part-time work: for example 15 hours/week for 24 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)
      • You can work as many part-time jobs as you need to meet this requirement
    • full-time at more than 1 job: 30 hours/week for 12 months at more than 1 job = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)

Part-time work experience

Your skilled work experience must be paid work including paid wages or earned commission. We don’t count volunteer work or unpaid internships.

For part-time work, you can work more or less than 15 hours/week as long as it adds up to 1,560 hours. You can work more than 1 part-time job to get the hours you need to apply.

We don’t count any hours you work above 30 hours/week.

Student work experience

Work experience gained while you were studying may count towards your minimum requirements if the work:

  • was paid by wages or commissions
  • was continuous (no gaps in employment), and
  • meets all the other requirements of the Program

If you meet these minimum requirements, you may be eligible to submit an Express Entry profile. However, please note that being eligible does not guarantee that you’ll be invited to submit an official application for Canadian permanent residence. Express Entry is a competitive immigration selection system, so only the highest ranking FSWC candidates will be invited to apply.

Federal Skilled Worker Points Grid

in our quest to know how to apply for express entry federal skilled worker we must not forget that to be eligible for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, candidates must score a minimum of 67 out of 100 points on this points grid. Please note that this is a completely separate points system from the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS)used to ranking all Express Entry profiles.

Admissibility

Some people no matter their quest to apply for express entry federal skilled worker in Canada, they aren’t allowed to come to Canada. They’re “inadmissible” under Canada’s immigration law.

A Canadian immigration officer will decide if you can enter Canada when you:

  • apply for a visa or an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) or
  • when you arrive at a port of entry.

due to different reasons like security , criminal or medical reasons, you won’t be allowed to enter canada.

If you’re inadmissible to Canada

Normally, if you’re inadmissible to Canada, you won’t be allowed to enter the country. If you have a valid reason to travel to Canada that is justified in the circumstances, we may issue you a temporary resident permit.

If you’ve committed or been convicted of a crime, you have a few options to overcome your criminal inadmissibility.

Final steps to  apply for express entry federal skilled worker in Canada

 

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